Ap Review: PTSD Coach

I love bringing my readers new mental health aps they can try! As you might have noticed, I have a lot of positive things to say about these aps. That’s partially because, in general, I have a lot of positive things to say about a lot of things. I want to share with you thingsContinue reading “Ap Review: PTSD Coach”

Interview with Felicia Nubivn, LMSW: Butterfly Gardens and Telehealth

Felicia Nubivn is a social worker, researcher, and advocate for social justice. We connected over Twitter, and she shared that she had been using a butterfly garden in telehealth sessions. Since I’m always looking for more telehealth ideas, I reached out, and Felicia was kind enough to take time to talk with me about herContinue reading “Interview with Felicia Nubivn, LMSW: Butterfly Gardens and Telehealth”

Therapy with Kids: What Makes an Activity Therapeutic?

I have noticed that many play therapy activities involve games developed in the 1970s and 80s. Additionally, a lot of the pushback against telehealth with kids has been that screen-time activities are not sufficiently “therapeutic.” This makes me think of how people initially thought card games would be the death of family time, since peopleContinue reading “Therapy with Kids: What Makes an Activity Therapeutic?”

Interview with Carol Wulff, LSW, Author

As a child therapist, I’m always looking for books to help kids understand their mental health, their symptoms, and learn coping skills. Carol Wulff, LSW, shared with me her experience of writing William, the What-If Wonder on His First Day of School. Carol is a social worker and mother of someone who lives with anxiety.Continue reading “Interview with Carol Wulff, LSW, Author”

Telehealth Activity: Pop-It

Pop-its, based on my extensive research, are the latest fidget toy that all the Young People are talking about (and, of course, by “extensive research,” I mean my clients have been talking about them). Not only are Pop-Its great for kids with sensory issues, but you can use them interactively in your sessions. Scratch hasContinue reading “Telehealth Activity: Pop-It”

Paradox: Helping Kids Talk About Unpleasant Feelings

A challenge I run into when talking with kids about their feelings is that most children want to please the adults in their lives. It is natural to want the people around you to be happy, and this is extra true for kids because they might associate upsetting adults with getting into trouble. If IContinue reading “Paradox: Helping Kids Talk About Unpleasant Feelings”

Telehealth Activity: Zen Photon Garden

I have been back in my office part-time the past few weeks, and it has been pretty great to be able to interact with my clients in person. We’ve been able to use actual, tangible fidgets, and when kids need help with something, I can usually actually step in and help them. I played TwisterContinue reading “Telehealth Activity: Zen Photon Garden”

Yahtzee for Telehealth

Yahtzee isn’t a game I use often in therapy, but it can be helpful for frustration tolerance, focus, and problem solving. It can be fun for groups working on taking turns as well. There are many options for playing Yahtzee online, but this website has a free dice set. Pull up the site, share yourContinue reading “Yahtzee for Telehealth”

Vera’s Sensory Corner

You probably remember Vera, my special cat who used to live outside. If you do, you’ll recall that Vera gets scared very easily and sometimes is afraid of things that aren’t really dangerous, like the stepladder and Amazon boxes. I thought today would be a good day to talk a bit about what Vera doesContinue reading “Vera’s Sensory Corner”

Evidence-Based Treatment and Clinical Flexibility

I want to talk today about a frustration that I have with rigid adherence to manualized and “evidence-based” treatment approaches in psychotherapy. Clients often ask me about medication options for their diagnosis. Although I don’t prescribe, for many, I am the first person they talk to when they are considering psychotropic medication, so I giveContinue reading “Evidence-Based Treatment and Clinical Flexibility”