Guess Who

Guess Who was a great therapy game in in-person sessions. It builds communication skills, problem solving, and focus. Fortunately, I recently discovered an online version that you can play with clients over Zoom. When you get to the site, select “Multiplayer” and “Create room.” Then give yourself a nickname and your room a password, andContinue reading “Guess Who”

Google Earth

I remember discovering Google Earth in high school (I just dated myself, oops!). The first place I went was my home address because I am not as creative as I’d like to believe. Since the seemingly endless pandemic began, one common theme in a lot of my sessions is grief about canceled trips. At first,Continue reading “Google Earth”

Go Fish

Simple card games are a great therapeutic tool because they allow the client to focus on the game while still engaging in talk or another intervention. The game distracts from anxiety about the topic at hand and can lower inhibitions. Of course, Uno is probably the most popular therapeutic card game, but it’s important toContinue reading “Go Fish”

You’re Grounded: The Problem with Punishing Self-Harm Behavior

(Content warning: this post talks about self-harm in general terms.) I’ve talked before about the challenge of conceptualizing behavior as a symptom of mental illness. This is especially challenging for parents when it comes to discipline; on the one hand, you can’t make symptoms go away by punishing them, but on the other hand, ifContinue reading “You’re Grounded: The Problem with Punishing Self-Harm Behavior”

White Boards

Therapists who use Zoom might be familiar with the white board feature: when you select “share screen,” one of the options is to share a white board. If you’re using a Chrome book, you can use Whiteboard Fox to create a private whiteboard to use with your client. Google also has Jamboard, which lets youContinue reading “White Boards”

Charades

Who didn’t love charades as a kid? Well, I didn’t because of my social anxiety, but most people really enjoyed it! Therapeutically, charades can help shy or anxious kids come out of their shell and can normalize being “silly” when the therapist takes their turn. It can also be a way to model different emotionsContinue reading “Charades”

The Three Conversations

Image text:“Every time you communicate with someone, three conversations happen:1. What you said2. What you meant3. What they heardFigure out how 2 and 3 diverge to fix a lot of miscommunication.” I say this a lot, and I wanted to talk a bit today about what this means for parents. A lot of “disobedience” byContinue reading “The Three Conversations”

Flashback Stopping

A common symptom of trauma is flashbacks, or re-experiencing a traumatic event. Flashbacks can feel very real, and it can seem like the event is happening all over again. I created a worksheet with prompts to help someone pull themselves out of a flashback, made so that individuals can choose which prompts are most beneficialContinue reading “Flashback Stopping”

Why Do Kids Lie?

An issue that a lot of parents bring up, either in the initial intake or at some point in their child’s treatment, is lying. “Why is my child lying to me?” “They know I will catch them in the lie!” “I’ve told them it’s important to tell the truth!” In my book, I talk aboutContinue reading “Why Do Kids Lie?”