Telehealth Activity: Minecraft

I’ve talked before about the therapeutic benefits of Roblox, a popular online game among my clients. A similar game that a lot of kids love is, of course, Minecraft. Initially I didn’t talk about Minecraft on this blog because I am trying to stick to interventions that you can access for free, and I was previously only aware of the paid version of Minecraft for multiplayer.

Of course, you can engage therapeutically through narration and working together with a single account in these games, but many therapists like to actually join their clients in the world of the game. Well, Crazy Games offers Minecraft Classic, basically the original Minecraft game that we all know and love, as a multiplayer game!

Minecraft Classic on CrazyGames

When the game loads, you get the option to create a room as the host. Choose a nickname, and send the link to your client via whatever platform you are using for telehealth. You can use this activity with groups as well, as rooms can hold up to 10 people total, including the host.

“You are the host. You can invite some (9) friends to join you.”

By following the link, your client(s) enter your private room, and strangers can’t join your room unless they have the link.

Once the game begins, you point your mouse in the direction where you want to look and move around with the W, A, S, and D keys. Space bar is jump, and clicking destroys blocks. 1-9 selects blocks, Enter saves, B opens the menu, T is chat, and F is toggle. This was a little confusing for me at first because I’m used to using arrow keys, but after a few minutes I got used to it.

With telehealth on the rise, many child therapists have spoken about the therapeutic benefits of Minecraft for problem solving, social skills, and creative expression. You can even complete this free training to learn how to use Minecraft in your sessions.

I love this free version of Minecraft because it lets you drop into the Minecraft world without an account and use many of these interventions in your telehealth sessions.

Published by Dr Marschall

Dr. Amy Marschall received her Psy.D. from the University of Hartford in September 2015. Her clinical interests are varied and include child and adolescent therapy, TF-CBT, rural psychology, telemental health, sexual and domestic violence, psychological assessment, and mental illness prevention. Dr. Marschall presently works in the Child and Adolescent Therapy Clinic at Sioux Falls Psychological Services in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, where she provides individual and family therapy and psychological assessment to children, adolescents, and college students. She also facilitates an art therapy group for adolescents and college students with anxiety and depression. Dr. Amy Marschall is certified in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Telemental Health.

%d bloggers like this: